NAR Global connects you to a network of qualified REALTORS®, provides education to help you work with international clients, and delivers the business tools to help you globalize your business.

International Real Estate Professionals

Find the information, education, and connections you need to thrive in the growing field of international real estate. NAR works to make the global real estate market accessible, profitable, and ethical for REALTORS®, and offers International REALTOR® Membership to real estate practitioners outside the U.S.

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Global Business Councils

Global Business Councils, comprised of volunteers and staff liaisons within the local or state structure of NAR, take the lead in planning global programs, hosting educational events and collaborating with other boards and outside entities to build awareness among members of the global business opportunities within their own market.

Global Alliances

NAR maintains formal relationships with 100 organized real estate associations around the world, giving REALTORS® confidence in working with professionals that abide by a code of ethics.

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NAR's Reach Is Global

The National Association of REALTORS® extends beyond the United States and is also a global trade association, providing resources and support to International REALTOR® Members around the world. Watch this video and learn more about the tools and resources NAR has for IRMs and how these can be used to grow their network and increase their business.

NAR en Español

NAR en español permite a los miembros y socios colaboradores acceder a información, herramientas, productos y servicios en español.

NAR Global

This issue introduces you to NAR Global's critical initiatives on several fronts, including education, expertise, networking, marketing, and more.

Local Market Assessments

These state-level case studies can help you learn to identify and cultivate global business, a growing real estate specialty in the U.S.
When Brazil’s economy deteriorated in the mid-1980s, many Brazilians began to leave their country for better opportunities. In the U.S. they were drawn to existing Brazilian and Portuguese communities in New York City, northern New Jersey, and Massachusetts.