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This article was published on: 05/01/2001


 ARCH TYPES
 
 

Amaze clients and customers with your architectural expertise about dozens of residential housing styles.

Architecture Index

Residential
Art Deco
California Bungalow
Cape Cod
Colonial
Contemporary
Craftsman
Creole
Dutch Colonial
Federal
French Provincial
Georgian
Gothic Revival
Greek Revival
International
Italianate
Monterey
National
Neoclassical
Prairie
Pueblo
Queen Anne
Ranch
Regency
Saltbox
Second Empire
Shed
Shingle
Shotgun
Spanish Eclectic
Split Level
Stick
Tudor
Victorian

Home features
Arches
Columns
Dormers
Roofs
Windows

Interior Details
Classic Molding
 There are six basic arch styles that frame and support doors, windows, porches, and other wall openings in homes.



A Roman arch is a strong, rounded arch that forms a semi-circle. Often made of masonry, Roman arches still stand in the Coliseum.




A Syrian, or segmental, arch forms a partial curve, or eyebrow, over a door or window. This arch has a slight rise and is semi-elliptical across the top.



Tudor arches are often described as "flattened" Gothic arches. They feature a point at the crown, but the span is much wider than the Gothic style.



A Flat arch, also known as jack or straight arch, extends straight across an opening with no curvature, creating a horizontal emphasis.



A narrow, pointed opening is the hallmark of a Gothic arch. The Gothic arch developed as a more sinuous and elegant successor to the Roman arch and was widely used in cathedrals of the Middle Ages such as Notre Dame in Paris.


A Moorish, or horseshoe arch, extends beyond a semi-circle. The top of the arch is rounded and then curves in slightly before descending.

To learn more about Palladian arches, read Architecture Coach: The Power of Palladio.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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