South America

Regional Coordinator's Message: Mario Rubio

Many of the countries in South America lack real estate licensing laws, but the Cooperating Associations in these countries are lobbying their governing authorities to institute changes. Often, NAR plays an important role in assisting their efforts.

For example, Peru was one of the first nations in South America to adopt license laws. NAR worked closely with the Associación Peruana de Agentes Immobilarios (ASPAI) in their efforts to help lawmakers develop an appreciation for the importance of regulations, with an emphasis on modeling U.S. practices.

Now Chile and Brazil are involved in the same process. Leadership from each country’s Cooperating Association regularly travel to NAR’s national and midyear conventions to deepen their understanding of how U.S. license laws are designed to protect the consumer and promote professionalism in the industry.

Additionally, NAR’s President’s Liaisons provide an important conduit between NAR and each country’s leadership, assisting in cooperative efforts throughout the year.

Getting Involved

Face-to-face involvement is an essential element of international business. In the U.S., introductions are often made via email or phone calls, but this is not common in other countries. Attending international events is the easiest way to make personal introductions with CIPS designees from around the world, as well as important association officials. It’s an investment that will quickly pay for itself many times over.

Before traveling to other countries, there are many other ways to build your global connections at a local level. If your local REALTOR® association (or another association near you) has a Global Business Council, attend their meetings and get involved.

Also, study your local market for global influences and find ways to strengthen your ties to those markets. For example, Boston has a strong Brazilian presence, and Miami is home to many Peruvians. Both Brazil and Peru host excellent real estate conventions, which would be a logical first trip for a global agent looking to deepen their market-to-market connections.

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